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Dr. Boyce and Yvette Carnell: Air Jordan Mania and Black People – Over the Top?

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Most of you saw the recent insanity over the release of the new Air Jordans.  When black people are lining up around the block to spend money that they dont’ have on shoes that cost $12 to make, is there a point where we have to stop and say “enough is enough?”

In a very candid conversation on the topic, Dr. Boyce Watkins speaks with Your Black World political contributor Yvette Carnell about this phenomenon and what it means for the African American community.

via Dr. Boyce and Yvette Carnell: Air Jordan Mania and Black People – Over the Top?.

James

6 Comment

  1. I think your right but we also need more Black people with a Voice to speak & mentor and give them better ways to spend or save money. Where is the constent and needed assistance with helping a lost generation. No its not easy helping anyone who doesnt want it. It has to start somewhere, & the younger the better. If i had a Voice that was listened to I would have a lot of choices and assistence for change. (Wishing for a Better People)..

  2. What’s even more ridiculous is that Michael Jordan is no longer playing basketball,so based on that fact alone, I don’t understand the hype surrounding this product, nevermind that these shoes are mass-produced in some sweatshop and will become obsolete next month, or will fall apart if they even come close to a puddle of water. Is it any wonder that most African Americans know nothing about saving or being savvy about money.

  3. A joke to me for real
    Updated 21st century slaves buying cheap slave labor shoes.
    The kkk and the rest of these racist’s are laughing like crazy with the crazy,twisted,brainwashed behavior of black people of the 21st century.

  4. Once again our ignorance shines through.

  5. It pains me to see african-american men and women who are dead, deaf and dumb paying a ridiculous price for a pair of tennis. It is well known that Michael Jordan does not even care for african-american women. How much would these same women pay for a book to enrich their childrens lives? And, how many books are in their homes?

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